September 18, 2021

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‘7 Prisoners Review: A Gripping, Sওo Paulo-Set Thriller

3 min read

Near the start of “7 Prisoners”, the illuminated high galaxy of Sao Paulo echoes the praises of a group of young rural Brazilians as a minivan ferries through the city for the first time in their lives. Within minutes of Brazilian-American director Alexandre Moratto’s skilled, socially conscious thriller, they personally didn’t know their world was so big, it would become smaller than they could have imagined. As migrant labor quickly and all too easily turns into the slavery of the modern day, bright in the moment, terror in the moment becomes more lasting, sweaty moral panic: it seems, the only way out of this prison is to become a prison guard yourself.

Moratto’s first film “Socrates” won him the Sami to Two Watch Award at the 2019 Independent Spirit Awards, and more polished, pump-up evidence of “7 Prisoners” To hit the screen: not just talent, which was already clear enough, but more mainstream sensitivity. The work is done: Produced by Fernando Mirelis and longtime consultant Ramin Bahrani, Morato Sophomore’s feature on poverty and exploitation in Brazil’s Favalas cannot be overstated by his humanitarian concerns, but why Netflix grasped this skillfully enough, just thought-provoking. Pieces.

Still, if “Pr John the Prisoner” sees Morato enter the bigger spotlight, he’s delighted to bring with him a key ally from the past: Christian Malheiros, a young Brazilian newcomer whose mature, emotionally intuitive performance was “so inseparable to Socrates’ success.” , ”And who again graciously took charge of the leading man here. Morato and co-writer Thaina Monteso, however, gave him fewer notes to play. This time their story depends more on type than on the rich dimensional character for its power: Malheiros’ naturally soulful presence fills several gaps in the 18-year-old protagonist Matthias, an alpha male of a point family of women who must leave with a small town job Small family property for his mother and sisters.

When he and a few other boys from his village board a shuttle to Sওo Paulo, doing all the safe work on the same metal scrapboard on the city limits, listeners are less likely to share the surprise of young people when, on arrival, work and living conditions were not what they promised: A dirty, cell-like dormitory, a thought of food and their changing new boss Luca (Rodrigo Santoro) cheating on the payment. When they raise their concerns, the situation worsens, fully exposing the trafficking trap in which they set foot: the boys are robbed of their phones, locked up in their dormitories while not working under strict surveillance, and their wages are suspended until No elaborate allegations are being made to pay off their living debts.

Although his colleagues are crying, angry, and trying in vain to escape, Matthews – who, after passing the eighth grade, is considered the brainchild of the team – firmly realizes that the only way to be compliant and ultimately complicated is with Luke’s corruption. As his collaboration gradually gives him special privileges and promotions from other members of the team, Matthias quietly wrestles with his conscience: is he climbing stairs in the hope of pulling others, or otherwise defending himself in hopeless situations? Malheiros’s internally injured performance makes this decision clear in the language of his heavy driving and deliberate, hesitant body. The right move is never signedpost.

Elsewhere, “Pr John the Prisoner” becomes a little easier for his viewers, even the gruesome, shady camerawork of Joao Gabriel de Quiroz and the nippy, stained editing of the film keeps us in the cold distance. Although Santoro’s performances are extraordinarily emotional Mateus’s colleagues, meanwhile, aren’t defined too much outside of a single feature at a time গরম hot-headed, anxious, and so on এবং and thus don’t really compete with the protagonist for our sympathy, even when feelings of betrayal occur.

This is where Moratto’s film, heart-accelerating, seeks character-based subtlety and the sensitivity of his debut. It’s what immerses us so deeply in the “what will you do” aspect of telling his story They Taxes, and why, get smaller contractions. Yet, “7 prisoners were released satisfactorily, without our full satisfaction or assurance. The question revolves around whether Matthews will ever be able to escape completely from his prison, or just into more comfortable furniture.

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